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Dr. O’Guin

Optimal Health Series: Nutrition

This is a tough one for most. Our love-hate relationship with food can make achieving any health related goal very difficult. In the first two videos of this Optimal Health series I outline what I have found to be the most important things to consider when tackling nutrition. Mindset The contradictions within the realm of nutrition are endless, which is part of what makes this the most difficult part of building a healthier lifestyle. So before we talk specifics, let’s start with the best way to approach the subject. This involves mostly just changing your mindset. Every single thing that we do in life begins with intention so I would recommend spending a decent amount of time developing that intention. This should include your purpose for wanting to make changes, what obstacles you might face, and the specific (and realistic) goals you hope to achieve. There are no wrong answers, but the...

Functional Rehabilitation

What It Is Functional rehabilitation is a way of assessing and correcting musculoskeletal imbalances and faulty movement patterns. Movement screens are used to discover imbalances or inadequate movement, and exercises are given based on each patient’s individual needs. Additionally, limiting activities are evaluated, with exercises being tailored to enhance the performance of necessary activities of daily living. The primary objective of functional rehabilitation is to educate patients on how to move their bodies more effectively and efficiently in order to maintain better posture and alignment. A good sense of body awareness, posture, balance and coordination are continuously stressed and encouraged. How It’s Different This approach differs from traditional physical therapy in that less emphasis is placed on finding and treating specific injured tissues. Finding an exact diagnosis can be difficult due to the close proximity of possible pain generators, this being especially true for spinal pain. Also, false negatives are very common with orthopedic...

Physical Therapy vs. Chiropractic; Which is Right for You?

Choosing a healthcare professional to work with on your treatment is an important decision and the more you know about your options, the easier that decision can be to make. In this video we learn the differences (or lack thereof) between Physical Therapy and modern-day Chiropractic.   What’s the difference? Traditionally chiropractic includes mostly the hands-on therapies: manual adjustments, myofascial release, stretching, etc.  These therapies are focused on loosening up the body and improving mobility. Physical Therapy, on the other hand, focuses on finding areas of instability and using exercises to improve stability in those areas. Although traditionally these treatments are very different, the modern practice of both Chiropractic and Physical Therapy is very similar. There is a vast amount of research out there touting the benefits of both the manual therapies of Chiropractic and the stability exercises of Physical Therapy. The trick of a good treatment plan is implementing the right therapy in...

Low Back Pain- In a Nutshell

Dealing with low back pain can be frustrating and confusing because what works for some may not work for you. The type of therapy that will be most effective depends mostly on what is causing the pain. In order to better understand your treatment options, it’s important to consider the different tissues that can be injured. Structures of the Spine There are essentially four different structures of the spine that can be injured and cause low back pain. Discs are the cushions in between vertebrae that allow us to be mobile. Over time they can become injured and basically wear down. Joints are where bones come together. There are small joints along the vertebrate in your spine and larger joints such as the in the hip; any of which can become restricted and cause pain. Muscles are the movers of the body and can develop trigger points or knots and muscle spasms....

Chiropractic Approach for Dr. O’Guin

As a chiropractor my main interest is in treating the muscles, joints, and other soft tissues of the body.  As you will see shortly my approach differs from the current healthcare model.  The following are some of the flaws of our current healthcare system: 1) waiting to long until there is enough damage to actually be detected by imaging. 2) only focusing on the site of the break or pain. 3) Having the primary goal of only removing pain. This model of waiting for major injury to occur is exponentially more expensive that simply taking the necessary steps to keep the body aligned the way it is intended to be.  For example joint replacement surgery has doubled between 2000 and 2006.  Osteoarthritis known as the wear and tear disease is predicted to have costs rise by 40% by 2030. My approach is similar to the old saying of an ounce of...

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